Oregon Sales Tax?

Oregon legislators have proposed a marijuana sales tax.

Say what?!!!

Yes, Oregon, the go-to State in the Pacific Northwest when you don’t want to pay sales tax, is now thinking about taxing cannabis at the retail level.

According to legislatures, some of the benefits include:

1) Sales tax would better accommodate fluctuation in market prices

2) would readily allow the sale of medical and recreational marijuana by the same retailer, exempting those with a medical marijuana card from paying a retail sales tax

This is just the beginning. Oregon is looking at solutions to temporarily allow sales of recreational marijuana at medical marijuana dispensaries, when the state officially legalizes the plant on July, 1, 2015. If this is not allowed, expect to purchase product at Portland marijuana stores later in the year, or into 2016.

The Price of Weed

Oregon wins!

According to www.priceofweed.com and Forbes, the state of Oregon cruises into first place with the least expensive price of weed. $204 for an ounce.

Don’t let this price of marijuana in Oregon fool you. Just because the price of pot is cheap, doesn’t mean that the quality is also cheap. Oregon has always been known for quality when it comes to cannabis.

Washington State, just North of Oregon, has a fairly inexpensive price for weed: just $232 per ounce. This is interesting because recreational marijuana stores within the state has received quite a few complaints for high prices.

Overall, it’s also interesting to note that the cost of weed in the western USA is a lot more inexpensive when compared to the midwest or east coast.

It will be interesting to see how this price fluctuates once Oregon and the city of Portland welcomes legalized cannabis on the first of July, 2015.

 

 

 

 

Should weed stores in Portland be able to stay open late?

So far there are two recreational marijuana industries that are up and running: one in Colorado and one in Washington State. More specifically, let’s focus on the most populated cities of each state: Denver and Seattle.

Of the many industry differences when comparing these two cities, one of them is how late a recreational pot shop is allowed to stay open. In Denver, weed shops are only allowed to stay open until 7pm.  This is interesting and a bit surprising since you are able to purchase alcohol much later into the evening. Aurora, a bustling city less than a 30 minute drive from Denver, has countered Denver’s stance by allowing their recreational marijuana shops to remain open until 10pm.

Seattle is more similar to Aurora than Denver. In fact, Uncle Ike’s Pot Shop just celebrated April 20, aka 4/20, by staying open until late. Rumor has it, they stayed open until midnight!

So, what should Portland do? Should we follow the steps of Denver, and make the weed shops close early, maybe 7 or 8pm. Or should we allow the stores to set their own hours.

One benefit of allowing stores to set their own hours and stay up late is: residents and tourists will have more opportunities throughout the day to purchase recreational cannabis. This means more sales and more taxes collected.

But, there can also be some negatives. For one, later hours could invite criminal activity. Right now, recreational marijuana is pretty much a cash only business. At this time, federally insured banks do not want to take a risk and deal with a business that is legal on a state level but illegal on a federal level.

What do you think? Should Portland marijuana stores be allowed to set their own hours and open late, or should their be a limit of how late they can open?

You may be able to purchase legal marijuana on July 1, 2015

The Oregon Legislature is looking over a plan that would allow state medical marijuana dispensaries to temporarily sell recreational marijuana. If this goes into effect, you will be able to purchase recreational weed on July 1, 2015, when cannabis officially becomes legal in the State.

Perhaps Oregon has observed how Washington State handled their rollout of the legal industry, and wants to improve upon that. Washington didn’t give the medical marijuana dispensaries a temporary ability to sell recreational marijuana when they made legalization official in December of 2012. Instead, they basically waited until July 2014 for the first legal pot shop, Cannabis City, opened.

For more than a year and a half, marijuana was legal in Washington but their was no way to obtain it. Instead, a bunch of rogue delivery services, operating out of grey-area status, emerged to provide marijuana to adults over the age of 21. The most famous of these weed delivery services was the now defunct Winterlife Cooperative, which is now Winterlife Cannabis, a Washington state producer of edibles.

Allowing medical marijuana dispensaries a temporary order to sell recreational weed seems like a viable solution if the Oregon legislature approves. If not, Oregon could allow delivery services but be more proactive than Washington was.

Is Weed Legal in Portland, Oregon?

As you may already know, last month Oregon legalized recreational marijuana along with Alaska. Washington D.C. joined the party as well but with legislation that was a little bit different. With the addition of Oregon and Alaska, there are now 4 states including Washington and Colorado, who have legalized cannabis. The district of Washington DC makes it 5 total areas.

One of the questions we get asked the most, now that Oregon has become the 3rd state to legalize pot: Is Weed Legal in Portland, Oregon? The short answer is no, or not yet.

Now for the longer answer. According to Oregon.gov in the frequently asked questions section: Starting July 1, 2015, Measure 91 allows the personal use and possession of recreational marijuana under Oregon law.  It also gives OLCC authority to tax, license and regulate recreational marijuana.

So, in roughly 6 months, adults 21 or older will be able to possess and use marijuana. This will also give the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, or the OLCC, the authority to regulate recreational marijuana, much like the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) oversees the recreational cannabis industry to the North.

Although recreational marijuana will technically be legal to possess and use beginning July 1 of 2015, it is not known f there will be any legal retail stores open to sell the product. If this is the case, one may wonder if grey area recreational marijuana delivery services will pop up just like they did in Washington State, especially Seattle.

So, there you have it: Is marijuana legal in Portland, Oregon: No or Not Yet.

Prediction: Oregon Legalizes Marijuana Along With D.C.

Our prediction for this evening is that Measure 91 will pass and marijuana in Oregon will be legal for adults. Of course, if Oregon does win, there will be a long ways to go to launch the recreational marijuana industry.

Alaska and Washington D.C. will also be voting on recreational marijuana measures today. We predict that D.C. will win big but Alaska, we are not so sure. May just be too close to call. In fact, we might not even know by tonight.

If Oregon legalizes marijuana, then Portland could become the 3rd major US city to create an industry of recreational marijuana stores. I will be interesting to see how the recreational marijuana industry unfolds in the Rose City and how long it takes to get it off the ground.